Jump to content

Welcome to Cinema 4D Tutorials
  • Log in with Twitter
  •     

    Remember me
    Sign in anonymously
Photo

Invest In Rope...


  • Please log in to reply
No replies to this topic

#1 SFX

SFX

    Site Admin

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,515 posts
  • Local time: 12:16 PM
  • Favorite Apps:Cinema 4D, Max, RealFlow, Terragen, Motionbuilder
  • Location:London UK
  • Machine Specs:I7 930 4.2 Ghz 12 GB Ram

Posted 31 October 2013 - 03:29 AM

With yet more news of the continuing bloodshed in Iraq due directltly to the actions of the west it is worth pointing out, again, how we have been conned and duped by those who seek to gain as much profit as they can knowing full well that their actions are a direct cause for the deaths of hundreds of thousands if not millions of innocent people. While we are told to "tighten our belts" these bastards ( who created the financial mess the world is in) continue to peddle their wares and steal from the likes of you and me.

The accounting of the financial cost of the nearly decade-long Iraq War will go on for years, but a recent analysis has shed light on the companies that made money off the war by providing support services as the privatization of what were former U.S. military operations rose to unprecedented levels.

Private or publicly listed firms received at least $138 billion of U.S. taxpayer money for government contracts for services that included providing private security, building infrastructure and feeding the troops.

Ten contractors received 52 percent of the funds, according to an analysis by the Financial Times that was published Tuesday.

The No. 1 recipient?

Houston-based energy-focused engineering and construction firm KBR, Inc. (NYSE:KBR), which was spun off from its parent, oilfield services provider Halliburton Co. (NYSE:HAL), in 2007.

The company was given $39.5 billion in Iraq-related contracts over the past decade, with many of the deals given without any bidding from competing firms, such as a $568-million contract renewal in 2010 to provide housing, meals, water and bathroom services to soldiers, a deal that led to a Justice Department lawsuit over alleged kickbacks, as reported by Bloomberg.

Who were Nos. 2 and 3?

Agility Logistics (KSE:AGLTY) of Kuwait and the state-owned Kuwait Petroleum Corp. Together, these firms garnered $13.5 billion of U.S. contracts.

As private enterprise entered the war zone at unprecedented levels, the amount of corruption ballooned, even if most contractors performed their duties as expected.

According to the bipartisan Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the level of corruption by defense contractors may be as high as $60 billion. Disciplined soldiers that would traditionally do many of the tasks are commissioned by private and publicly listed companies.

Even without the graft, the costs of paying for these services are higher than paying governement employees or soldiers to do them because of the profit motive involved. No-bid contracting - when companies get to name their price with no competing bid - didn't lower legitimate expenses. (Despite promises by President Barack Obama to reel in this habit, the trend toward granting favored companies federal contracts without considering competing bids continued to grow, by 9 percent last year, according to the Washington Post.)

Even though the military has largely pulled out of Iraq, private contractors remain on the ground and continue to reap U.S. government contracts. For example, the U.S. State Department estimates that taxpayers will dole out $3 billion to private guards for the government's sprawling embassy in Baghdad.

The costs of paying private and publicly listed war profiteers seem miniscule in light of the total bill for the war.

The Costs of War Project by the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University said the war in Iraq cost $1.7 trillion dollars, not including the $490 billion in immediate benefits owed to veterans of the war and the lifetime benefits that will be owed to them or their next of kin

Invest in rope now, there will be a massive shortage when we come to string all these bastards up




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users